Disease Prevention

Mosquitoes live and thrive off of food, water and shelter. Mosquito eggs can hatch in as little as a few millimeters of water. Before you can become mosquito free, make sure to check these areas that can become mosquito breeding areas:

Home Owner

  1. Yard waste, lawn cuttings in gutter or storm drains
  2. Low lying areas in yard where water can pool
  3. Gutters or eavestroughs
  4. Compost or organic matter spread across lawn
  5. Stagnant water of any kind
  6. Open or broken window screens and attic vents that allow mosquitoes to enter your home freely
  7. Pool covers that can collect rain water
  8. Toys or other objects around your yard
  9. Wheelbarrows or tires
  10. Leaky faucets that can cause water to gather

Additional tips for Cottage Owners

  1. Turn over canoes, kayaks or other flotation devices that can collect standing water
  2. Empty water collected in tarps around yard
  3. Keep grass cut short at all times
  4. Make sure screen doors are tightly secured and are without holes and don’t have holes
  5. Use LED lighting if possible

Get your neighbours involved:

There’s power in numbers. The more preventative steps you and your neighbour take on, the more successful your mosquito control systems will be. Talk to your neighbors, find out what methods they use and share these tips with them.

Make sure to remove food and shelter from your yard

  • Make sure composts and food scrap containers are sealed tight
  • Always put garbage in garbage bags and don’t leave garbage bins open
  • Keep branches and shrubbery will trimmed and immediately dispose of waste
  • Do not leave piles of leaves or lawn clippings lying around yard
First Week Second Week Third Week
Initial Mosquitoes Lay Eggs Once 50% Females Assume 20% Female Survival Lay Eggs Once 50% Females Assume 20% Female Survival Lay Eggs Once 50% Females Assume 20% Female Survival
1 300 150 31 9,300 4,650 961 288,300 144,150 29,791
100 30,000 15,000 3,100 930,000 465,000 96,100 28,830,000 14,415,000 2,979,100
500 150,000 75,000 15,500 4,650,000 2,325,000 480,500 144,150,000 72,075,000 14,895,500

This chart helps illustrate exactly how fast mosquito populations can grow in your living area.

This chart assumes a few things: a) that 50% of the population is female (biting mosquitoes) and b) That 20% of the mosquito eggs born live to become adult and c) Every mosquito will lay their eggs once in their lifetime (300 eggs total).

If there are 500 mosquitoes in your backyard, it will only take three weeks for those mosquitoes to multiply to 14,895,500 BITING Mosquitoes.

Remember: Only female mosquitoes bite!


Did you know?

  • Mosquitoes are the deadliest species on earth – more than sharks, tigers and crocodiles. Mosquitoes carry terrible diseases including West Nile Virus, Malaria, Dengue Fever, Chikungunya Virus and the Zika Virus to name a few.
  • In just one month, 1 female mosquito (if unchecked) can multiply up to 1.5 million mosquitoes! Over the course of one full mosquito season (if left unchecked), this can result in an exponentially larger number.
  • A female mosquito is impregnated just ONCE in its lifetime but needs to bite for blood each time it is ready to develop its eggs.
  • Only female mosquitoes bite, which they do to give sustenance to their eggs.
  • Mosquitoes can live up to 6 months – imagine all of the baby mosquitoes created in their lifetime!
  • Some mosquitoes prefer not to bite humans and instead target animals such as horses and birds.
  • Depending on temperature, mosquito eggs need 4-6 days to transition into adults.
  • A female mosquito’s saliva contains an anti-coagulant that makes it easier to suck up more blood. This saliva causes the victim to have an allergic reaction after being bitten, which makes their skin itchy.
  • Mosquitoes, although incredibly annoying insects, are vital to nature’s ecosystem – bats, dragonflies, spiders and other insects depend on them for food. GREENSTRIKE’s Mosquito Preventer helps to reduce the population of bad mosquitoesand leaves a small population behind so the food cycle can naturally exist.

Did you know?

There are over 3,500 different mosquito species around the world! 74 different species in Canada, 166 species in United States (continental) and 224 species in Mexico.

Only certain species of mosquitoes can carry diseases. For instance, the Culex species of mosquito can carry West Nile Virus but cannot carry Dengue Fever or Yellow Fever.